Plus one

May 8, 2012

I’ve given birth to a new Swede. He is of course named after our king. As you would expect he is gorgeous; blond, blue eyed and tall as all Swedes are. He is the apple of my eye.

I’m now enjoying one year of paid maternity leave. In the land of equality my hubby will continue with his paternity leave for another six months when I go back to work. Of course fully paid as well.

Did I mention the sun is shining too?

Nothing is wrong

September 12, 2011

Brendan Francis Newnam says it so well. And to answer his question: Nothing, nothing is wrong.

The Pope’s adviser

September 18, 2010

I’ve totally missed the Pope’s visit to the UK. However it made me laugh when I saw a friend’s sarcy comment about the Pope’s visit to the UK on Facebook, and one of her friends wrote to her:

“Apparently his adviser thinks the UK is like a 3rd world country!!!”

Well I must say this adviser really hit the nail on the head there. He really knows what he’s talking about. The UK is a third world country. A very rich third world country, but even so, a third world county.

A cuppa

April 17, 2010

So we had some Brits at the office the other day, and I met with one of them in the kitchen while I was making myself a cup of tea. He wanted coffee but we had just run out so I offered him tea instead.

I pulled out the kitchen drawer where we store our tea and he just looked confused. We have about teen different types of tea, which is quite normal for an office in Sweden.

-I want normal tea, he said staring down and all the different tins of tea, and of course I knew what he meant.
-I’m very sorry we don’t do normal tea in Sweden, I said to him in my very British accent, Early Gray is as normal as it gets over here, fancy that?
-Fuck that, he kindly answered me and got back to the meeting.

Swedish builders drink strong black coffee and not tea, so you won’t find any Builders Tea in Sweden. However I could offer you a nice cup of rhubarb & cream tea, or how about some red rooibos Champagne & elderflower tea, or maybe some nice Autumn Glow tea. No?

Does size matter?

March 21, 2010

I’ve now been back in Sweden for two years, and I’ll have to stop telling people I’ve just moved back.

And life is that paradise I was dreaming of when I wasn’t living here. Sweden is the best country you can live in. It’s a fact. And being back, having lived in a grey, dirty, dysfunctional (but oh so lovely) country, I appreciate everything Sweden has to offer. I’m like tourist on drugs; I can’t stop raving about this fantastic country.

But… Stockholm is such a small city. 1 000 000 people share this city with me, which includes the people in the suburbs as well.

I don’t have a travel pass, as I can walk everywhere I want to go. That’s the size of the capital city of Sweden!

And I walk around this heavenly paradise thinking there is something missing, something I’m not sure Sweden can offer me. It could be Boots I’m thinking of, or fox hunting and men in red cord trousers. But then I feel it goes a bit beyond that. It’s hard to put your finger on it.

I’ve just been to London and when I was walking down a very sunny Brompton Road with a strawberry and cream frappuccino from Starbucks in my hand (another thing I can’t get in Sweden), sunglasses on, I had a very content feeling bubbling inside of me. The sun once again melted my very cold, frozen Scandinavian winter soul.

-Would it be weird if I moved back to London cos of the weather? I asked my ex neighbour later that evening, when we stood outside on the balcony of my hotel suite, counting Porsches.

I realise the slight humour in this, since England is the land of rain. But the thought has certainly occurred to me last couple of weeks. And when England delivers only the best, it’s so hard to remember why I choose to move away from it all.

I mean to be in a suite in a five star hotel with your friends, drinking Champagne and eating canapés, life feels rather good. And with Mr double-barrel surname talking poshish in my ear, it’s so easy to just want to move back.

But everyday life in England is not a hotel suite in a five star hotel in London. Everyday life in England is more like a slush puppy and a bag of crisps. I must try to remember that.

Did someone say Paris?